Is the ATPase Assay Right for Your Needs?

Oct 10, 18 Is the ATPase Assay Right for Your Needs?

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As you start to search for the right assays, it becomes very important that you understand your exact requirements. This will make it much easier for you to parse through the options and find an ATPase assay, or any other assay for that matter, that is going to work for your needs. When you are searching for the assay, one of the first things that you should do is look at the common applications for which it is being used and what it is capable of doing. This will help to give you a better idea of whether it might be right for you. How Is the Transcreener ATPase Assay Being Applied Currently? Some of the most common applications for the ATPase activity assays include being used for screen compound libraries for enzyme inhibitors. They can measure enzyme activity, determine the resistance times for inhibitors, determine the inhibitory selectivity between various enzymes, and can provide profile hits for the potency of inhibitors. For those who want to have a safe option for their assays, this is non-radioactive, and it can provide you with more accuracy and fewer false positives than you might find with other types of assays on the market today. This, combined with the ease of use could be just what you have been hoping to find. Not As Many Steps With the ATPase Assay Kit Another reason that you may want to consider using this kit is because it has fewer addition steps. Naturally, this means that you can take care of your work quicker and get your results faster. There is not going to be as much interference or chance for error because there are fewer steps. You will also find that there are three readout options that you can choose. These include the fluorescence polarization, fluorescence intensity, and the TR-FRET assay. If you are unsure of what ATPase assay you choose, or if you are wondering whether another option might be the best choice for you, get in touch...

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Evaluating A Polymer Testing Lab

Aug 23, 17 Evaluating A Polymer Testing Lab

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For a polymer manufacturer, an Original Equipment Manufacturer (OEM) or even for a company that is trying to determine the composition of an unknown sample, finding a polymer testing lab to complete the analysis and provide the data required is an important step. Most of the companies listed above will use outside testing facilities as the cost of maintaining state-of-the-art equipment and keeping trained technicians on staff is cost prohibitive. By finding the right lab to work with for polymer testing, it is almost as if there was an in-house lab, just without all the additional cost to the business. To find the right polymer testing lab, evaluate any labs you are considering based on the following 4 factors. Procedures and Testing Capabilities Established labs will have a full range of procedures required for testing, analyzing, identifying and evaluating any samples provided. This includes specific types of specialized tests such as DSC, FTIR, TGA and MI/MFR testing to name just a few. It may also include manual types of tests such as failure analysis testing through microstructural analysis, which requires expertise, experience and high levels of professional training. Sample Size Requirements Most of the best labs will be able to test using very small sample sizes of the polymer. The sample size will be dependent on the number of tests, but simple tests will require five milligrams and multiple tests about three times that sample size. Testing Completion Times There will be a variation on the testing completion times that are related to the capacity of the lab. Ideally, look to a lab that will have the test results available in a few business days from the arrival of the sample. A few of the top labs may offer 24-hour rush processing. Pricing When comparing a polymer testing lab to another based on price, remember to consider order processing time, testing options and capacity as well as the ability to pay using a method convenient for your business. By making these comparisons, it will...

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The Steps In Polymer Characterization

Apr 26, 17 The Steps In Polymer Characterization

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There are many different reasons for a company to want to test specific types of polymers. It may be to test the specific characteristics of a given polymer, or it may be reverse engineer an unknown polymer to determine the underlying base materials. The process of polymer characterization is very specific and has to be carried out under very precise conditions. Laboratories that are able to handle these testing procedures will carefully choose from the variety of testing options available to determine specific characteristics of the polymer that will lead to the characterization of the different issues such as thermal properties, mechanical properties and issues such as molecular structure. Understanding the Right Tests The first step that the laboratory or testing facility needs to take is to determine the best possible test for polymer characterization. Depending on the specific requirements from the client, there may be multiple tests involved. Typically, with any type of characterization of polymers, more than one test will be important. This will provide redundancy in the results and lead to increased accuracy and validation of results throughout the process. Checking Thermal Properties The way that polymer responds to heat through the use of melt flow rate, relative viscosity, melt volume rate and even crystallinity. By understanding the crystallinity of a given polymer, it is possible to determine issues such as dimensional change and even how and if the polymer will warp during typical use based on the polymer characterization results. Validating Materials While not a direct requirement of characterization of polymers, the same processes can also be used to validate the materials. In other words, the tests that provide the information for characterization can also be used to assess and identify the filler materials as well as the polymers used, ensuring that particular polymers meet standards and industry requirements for marketing and validation purposes. Be the first to...

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Measuring How Heat Affects Polymers and Plastics

Oct 13, 16 Measuring How Heat Affects Polymers and Plastics

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Years ago, plastics were seen as cheap materials, considered “subar” when compared to things like metals or even wood. However, today nothing could be farther from the truth. With high tech plastics, resins and polymers, a wide range of durable and versatile materials can be created. However, high tech materials are affected by heat and understanding how heat affects these materials, can help you better understand your business and the needs of your customers. This is why procedures like DSC testing are needed. Let’s see why. Plastics and Polymers Plastic is a special kind of material known as a polymer. Polymers are molecules bonded or chained together. They can be synthetic or natural and this type of molecular structure provides special properties like elasticity, stickiness, hardness and the ability to bounce like a ball. Polymers may also be in solid or liquid form. In addition, polymer properties are affected by heat or lack of heat. What is DSC Testing? DSC stands for “differential scanning calorimetry”. It is used to study thermal transitions within polymers. In other words, when heat is applied to a polymer, specific changes occur. For example, crystalline or solid polymers will melt at a given point and melting is a thermal transition. So how does differential scanning calorimetry work, it begins with heat. To start, a material is placed in an oven and heated. The oven usually contains two separate pans. One is used for the sample to be heated and other is left empty for reference. A control circuit monitors the heat and controls its flow inside the oven. To begin the heating process, both pans are heated at the same rate. This heating rate must remain constant throughout the test. In order to make sure each pan is heated the same, more heat must be applied to the pan with the sample. This is why each pan needs to have a separate heat source underneath. During the heating process, a computer charts both heating rate and heat flow. These...

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